Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1980

Center/Program

Center for Law and Philosophy

Abstract

My colleague has had a revelation. Professor Lloyd Weinreb's views about larceny have undergone a striking transformation in the last six months. As recently as May 1980, when he completed the preface to the third edition of his criminal law casebook,1 he held one set of views about The Carrier's Case2 and The King v. Pear.3 In the article published in this issue,4 he advances a different set of views about the two cases he regards as so important. He gives us no hint about how or why he underwent his change of heart. His transformation warrants our attention, for by examining his conflicting positions, we shall come to appreciate another set of discontinuities-those that, despite Professor Weinreb's views, in fact shape the history of larceny

Included in

Criminal Law Commons

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