Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1972

Abstract

JUDGE MIDONICK: We have a fantastic representation of our alumni here and we've overdone our 10:00 starting time and we're supposed to stop at 12:00 promptly in order for us to go to the Low Memorial Library for lunch, for those who are having lunch with us. In order to be on time for this afternoon's extravaganza we really ought to begin now. You must understand this program is entirely unrehearsed and therefore will be more interesting. We have with us today a panel of four whom I will introduce as they are to speak. The first speaker will speak for about forty-five minutes and he has a paper to present; and then we will have the others. At the end of that time, there will be a forty minute fun and games period when everyone here is entitled to make remarks. We are fortunate to have with us Dean Monrad Paulsen of the University of Virginia School of Law whom we hadn't expected and who will be able not only to ask questions but give answers during the last forty minute period. I myself am eagerly awaiting an answer or two. Now, to begin, the paper which is to be given on the subject of the relationship between promise and performances in state intervention in family life will be given by Peter L. Strauss, Associate Professor of Law, Columbia Law School. His background is Harvard '61 in physics and chemistry, strangely, and so we have a person who is very well rounded and his law degree comes from Yale in 1964. He was editor-in-chief of the Yale Law Journal – he clerked as a law assistant for not only the Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals in the District of Columbia, David Bazelon, who is a great expert on child problems in the court himself, but Professor Strauss clerked after that for United States Supreme Court Justice William Brennan. He taught criminal law for two years at the Haile Sellassie I University in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, and for three years was assistant to the Solicitor General of the United States. He joined Columbia's faculty this fall, so be very gentle with him.

Comments

Originally published in 9 Columbia Journal of Law & Social Problems 28, 1972.

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